If you’re in New York before April 25, 2015, check out Victor Moscoso’s acid rock posters and other works at the Andrew Edlin Gallery in Chelsea. Ken Johnson at The New York Times writes:

In the 1960s, Victor Moscoso produced some of the most memorable acid rock posters of the psychedelic revolution in San Francisco. He also contributed trippy strips to Zap Comix, the underground publication founded by R. Crumb. Organized by the curator and writer Dan Nadel and the graphic designer and design historian Norman Hathaway, this exhibition offers a tantalizing glimpse back at an unusually euphoric time for graphic design. Along with vintage concert posters, it presents original drawings, collages and surrealistic comic strips from 1967 to 1982, including several studies for one of Mr. Moscoso’s most famous images: the phallic, tap-dancing, hat-tipping Mr. Peanut, which graced the cover of Zap No. 4.

Born in Spain in 1936, Mr. Moscoso moved with his family to Brooklyn in 1940. One of the few celebrated psychedelic poster artists with extensive academic training, he attended Cooper Union and earned a B.A. at Yale. There he studied with the painter Josef Albers, whose color theories came in handy in 1966 when Mr. Moscoso started producing his chromatically electric posters for the Grateful Dead, the Doors and other bands. He also earned a master’s degree in painting at the San Francisco Art Institute in 1961.

If you’re not in New York or can’t make it by, take the virtual walkthrough on the gallery’s website right here.

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